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T^PRIL IQ, 1TT5. 



Souv>enir ^ ^ 



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Of the Celebration of the 120th 
Anniversary of . . . . 



TLhc Concovb jfiQbt. 




KCTON. KF^RIL 19, 1S95. 



O^O jj o) O /^ o) O i^ o) O (fo o) O i^ o) o 







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y 

THE BRONZE STATUE WHICH STANDS UPON THE SPOT WHERE CAPT. ISAAC 

DAVIS AND PRIVATE ABNER HOSMER FELL IN 

THE CONCORD FIGHT. 



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MM 15 19)1 







INQUIRE FOR THE . . 



Thompson Hardware Co. 

of Merrimack St., Lowell, 



If y oil zuaitt to be -well served 
wilh any. hing i7i their line. . . 



Fishing Tackle. 



0. A. RICHARDSON, 

1 08 Central Street, 

. . . Lcnvell, Mass. 

Doofts . Xines . IReels . IRoDs 

FLIES . niNNOW GANGS . LEADERS, Etc. 

Artificial Baits of all kinds. 



BEAN, of LOWELL, 

The well-k7iown aitd nuich patronized Baker, 

Will be on Acton Com- 
mon on the 19th, to 
provide for those who 
need anything in his 
line. 



. Hrttstic flPemodals . 

IN 

GRANITE AND flARBLE 

BY 

Hnbrews & Mbeeler, 

51 Thorndike Street, 

LOWELL, MASS. 



^p-iH 



Snyder Brothers^ 



I I 8 Merrimack Street, 
Lowell, Mass. 



^Leading Dentists. 




GOOD Drl( KmG. 

is the keystone of health. You can buy 

the keystone kind of teas and coffees of 
Dickson Bros., 68 Merrimack Street, Lowell, 
at a quick jump price. 



^THE ONLY ^ 

SARSAPARILLA 

Admitted at World's Fair. 



MVLE i5.— "Articles that are in any 
way dangerous or offensive, also pa- 
tent medicines, nostrums, and empi- 
rical preparations, whose ingredi- 
ents are concealed, will not be 
admitted to the exposition.'' 



'I" cur£®* 



NEAR 

UNION STATION. 



HAYDEN, 

PHOTOGRAPHER, 

122 Merrimack ^t., 

LOWELL, = = HASS. 







z 
o 

o 
o 

z 
o 

I- 
o 

< 



. . . THE 

Lowell One^P ricG Qothin^ Qo. 

Have a Stock of REUABLt 

Clothing, Hats and 
Furnishing Goods. 



*^ <^f\ f9^ 



Good, Strong, Serviceable All-Wool Suits, $5.00, $6.00, $7.00 and $8.00. 
Blacl( and Blue All-Wool Cheviot Suits, warranted fast color; price, $7.00. 

W« W/^ W/% 

» * » 

We call special attention to our line of black Clay-diagonal 
Worsted Suits that we are selling for $io.oo a suit. The usual price 
elsewhere for these suits is from $12.00 to $15.00; but our price is 
$10.00 per suit. We have a full line of dress and business suits 
ranging from $10.00 up, that is equal in every respect to the best 
custom tailor work. 

Our Boys' and Children's Department is SECOND TO NONE. 
Serviceable suits from $1.25 to $5.00. We call your attention to our 
line of ** Little Giant" Suits, as being specially adapted to the 
roughest kind of usage and warranted not to rip. Price, $5.00 
per suit. , • 



WE SELL NONE BUT RELIABLE GOODS. 



The Lowell One-Price Clothing Company, 

72 TO 86 MERRIMACK STREET, 

LOWELL. 




MIDDLESEX MUTUAL FIRE INSURANCE COMPANY. 

Incorporated March 3, 1826. 
69TH ANNUAL SXATEIVIENT. 

January I, 1895. 

Cash Assets 1578,441.50 

Liabilities ..... 281,916.46 

Permanent Fund . . . . 327,532.84 

70 per cent Return Premium on 5-year, 

50 per cent on 2 and 3 year, 

25 per cent on 1-year policies. 



GEORGE HEYWOOD, President. RICHARD F. BARRETT, Secretary and Treasurer. 

WILLIAM BARRETT, Assistant Secretary. 
4 



C. lb. riDeab Si Ca, 



of mest Hcton, 

with commendable enterprise and 
patriotism, are having a fine lot of 
Souvenir China made in Germany. 
It has the Davis Monument upon 
it and will be ready August 1 . 



Telephone, Boston I 2£ 



Frank Merriam Keezer, 
Counsellor-at-Law, 

89 STATE STREET. BOSTON, 



Residence, Acton, Mass. 




W. B. Hunt. 



G. L. ROBBINS. 



HUNT ^ CO.. Pharmacists, 

. . . Dealers in . . . 

pure 2)m0s anb (patent ni>eMcme8, 

AT CUT PRICES . 

Send lo cents for Trial Package of their Headache Powders. 

707 Washington Street, _ . - Boston, Mass. 



C. D. PLACE. 

R. W. PLACE. 



Reference : 
JOHN FLETCHER 



C. D PLACE & CO. 
OPTICIANS, 



ONE FLIGHT. 

TAKE ELEVATOR. 



NO 11 Winter Street, 



BOSTON. 




Hon. William A. Wilde, donor of the Memorial Library, erected and presented in 
memory and to the honor of the citizen soldiers of Acton. He has represented Maiden 
two years in the Legislature and filled other and important offices. He is a native of 
Acton. 




Luther Couaut, Esq., the 
president of the day. ^ He has 
acted as moderator of Acton 
town meetings one hundred and 
twelve times. He has been 
upon the board of selectmen 
and other official boards of the 
town, and was a member of the 
lower house of the State Legis- 
lature in 1866 and 1886. 




PRICE SIOO. 

Credenda Bicycles, Crawford Bicycles, 



PRICE $75. 



Ames Bicycles, 

PRICE $75. 



PRICE $75, $60 and $50. 

Youth's '' Special " Bicycles, 



PRICE $50. 



bicycles for Men and Women, Boys and Girls. Otir spacious 

basement devoted to the Wheel and the Sporting 

Goods Department of 

Hatters and Men's Outfitters, 

Cor. CENTRAL and MARKET ST5., LOWELL. 



Drs. Stetson & Moran, 

2)enti8t8, 

Concord, Mass. 



Office open every day. 

DR. STETSON in Mondays and Thursdays. 



FOR SALE. 



VERY 

DESIRABLE 

BUILDING 

LOTS 



"§ Upon Prospect Hill, 

ACTON CENTRE. 



r'?:*' 





Capt. Aaron C. Handley, 
a Sou of the Revolution. His 
grandfather and father served 
respectively in the wars of the 
Revolution and 1812. He 
fought for the Union as cap- 
tain of Co. E, Sixth Massa- 
chusetts Volunteers, for nine 
months. He represented the 
town of Acton in the lower 
house in 1855, 1863, 1889, 
1890. lu the last named ses- 
sions he was dean of the house. 



L N. FOWLER & CO. 

DEALERS IN 

Dry Goods, Groceries, Hardware, 
Paints, Oils, Glass, Putty, etc. 

Sole agents for WHITE DOVE FLOUR. 

A KUI.I. LINE OF 

Boots, Shoes and Rubbers. 



No. 2 ASSOCIATION BLOCK, 

Concord Junction, Mass. 



NOTE THIS FACT! 



Good looks are what every one desires, and 
there is nothing that adds so mncli to one's per- 
sonal appearance as white and well-kept teeth, 
which you can easily have by a daily use of 
Concord Tooth Powder, which not only cleans 
tlie teeth and preserves them, but purifies the 
breatli. Prepared only by II. S. Kichardson, 
next door to Post Ottice, Concord, Mass., wliere 
you will also find a few of the genuine Thoreau 
pencils, made in the Thoreau family fifty years 
ago. By sending 25c. we will mail either of the 
above to your address. 






^ 




CAPT. ISAAC DAVIS LEADING HIS MEN FROM HIS HOME, 
ON THE MORNING OF APRIL 19, 177S, TO MEET THE BRITISH AT THE CONCORD NORTH BRIDGE. 



This cut is from an etching by Arthur F. Davis, which is a copy of Mr. Davis' 
painting in the library. The painting was presented to the Memorial Library by Moses 
Taylor, Esq. The etching is a fine work of art 14 x 20 inches and may be procured 
from F. P. Wood, Acton, Mass., the publisher of this souvenir, for $3.00. Order 
at once. 



PURE BLOOD 

Is the Foundation of Good Health, and 

Hood's Sarsaparilla 

Is the Only 
True Blood Purifier 

Prominently in the Public Eye To-day, 




Moses Taylor, P^sq., a Son 
of the Revolution whose grand- 
father commanded a company 
in the battle of Bennington. 
He represented the Acton dis- 
trict in the lower house of the 
Legislature in 1882. He was 
for several years captain of the 
Davis Gruards. He is the senior 
member of the Board of Trus- 
tees of the Memorial Library. 



ALWAYS ON TOP 



Don't look in vain when you can always find the best line of 

Watches^ Clocks, Jewelry and Silverware 

In town at 

OLIVER'S JEWELRY STORE, 

LOWE'S BLOCK, = = = MAYNARD. 

SIXTEEN YEARS TELLS THE STORY, 

On Top Then. On Top Now. 

J8^"Please remember I give j^ersonal attention to watch repairing. I employ no ap- 
prentice to tinker with your watch. 

10 



Hon. John Fletcher, a mem- 
ber of the committee of ar- 
rangements for this celebra- 
tion. He represented Acton in 
the lower house in 1861 and in 
the senate in 1870-71. He was 
for twenty years chorister of 
the Congregational Church, and 
president of the Schubert Cho- 
ral Union since its organization 
in 1869. Member of the lirm 
of S. T. Fletcher & Co. 




Ustablished 1875. Telephone Connection. 

S. T. Fletcher & Co. 

Coimnission Merchants 
. . . and Dealers in . . . 

Butter, Cheese, Eggs, Beans, &c., 

1 1 4 South Market Street, 
Boston. 



General Agents For Patent Egg Cases. 



Upon the sides of the Davis monument mound lie' tlie^rslate stones which for 
seventy-1ivefyears[stood at the head of the patriot's grave. The following are two of 
the inscriptions : 

'' In memor}^ of Capt. Isaac Davis, who was slain in battle at Concord, April ye 
11), 177o, in the defence of ye just rights and liberties of his country, civil and 
religions. He was a loving husband and a kind neighbor, an ingenious craftsman and 
serviceable to mankind. Died in ye prime of life, aged 30 years, 1 month and twenty- 
five days." 

"[Here lies the body of Mr. Abner Hosmer, who was killed at Concord in ye 
defence of je just rights of his country, being in the twenty-first year of his age." 

* rCnaries Wheeler, the presentTowner of the home of Capt. Davis, has erected s 
suitable memorial stone with this inscription upon it : 

" This farm was the home of Capt. Isaac Davis, who was killed in battle by the 
British, at the Old North Bridge in Concord, April 19, 1775." 




George C. Wi'ight, Esq., rep- 
resented this district in the 
lower house of the Legislature 
in LS74. He is a member of 
one of the largest coffee and 
spice houses in America. His 
wife, Susan H. (Davis), is a 
grand niece of Capt. Isaac 
Davis and is also connected 
witli the family of Abner Hos- 
mer. 



JAMES F. DWINELL. GEO. C. WRIGHT. 

DWINELL, WRIGHT & CO., 

IMPORTERS, COFFEE AND SPICE ROASTERS. 

ESTABLISHED 1845. 

Branches; Chicago, Cincinnati, St. Louis. Boston Office and Factory, I and 3 Hamilton 
Street, 35 and 37 Batterymarch Street. 

12 




WIFE OF CAPT. ISAAC DAVIS. 

" It was the citizen soldier — the Minute Man who sprung to his arms at 1 o'clock 
in the morning of April 19, 1775, on Lexington Common. It was Citizen Soldier 
Isaac Davis of Acton, who kissed his baby in the cradle for the last time, and threw 
his arms lovingly, for the last time, around the neck of his devoted wife Hannah on 
that morning, and who led his company to Concord Bridge, to give his life that liberty 
might live. It was the wife of a citizen soldier, Hannah Davis, who powdered the 
hair of the thirty-five men in her husband's company on that morning, that they might 
meet the hated red coats as gentlemen." — Gov. Frederick Greenlialge. 



luscription upon C'apt Davis's tablet : ^'This 
farm was the home of Capt. Isaac Davis, who 
was killed iu battle l)y the British at the 
Old [North Bridge iu Concord, April 19, 1775." 

The spot where Capt. Davis fell is marked 
hj a clump of apple tree slirubs, a few rods 
from the Minute Man. Emerson used to call 
this "the burnlno; bush." 



The site of the home of Capt. Joseph Ilob- 
bius, where the alarm was given to Acton ou 
the moruiug ot April 19, 1775, is upon the rise 
of laud north ot the East Acton R. E. station, 
and is now properly marked by the following: 
"Site of house where first alarm was given in 
Acton, morning of 19th of April, 1775. " ' Capt. 
Robliius I ( "apt. Eobbius I the regulars are 
coming." " 



13 



W. J. DOBINSON, Proprietor. 



Suffolk Engrav>ing Co., 

HALF=TONE ENGRAVING. PROCESS ENGRAVING. 



275 Washington St., = = Boston, Hass. 

Makers of Half-Tones in This Book. 



P 



roGuamme . . . . 



RINGING OF BELLS AT SUNRISE, NOON AND SUNSET. 



9 O'CLOCK. 



Dedication of tablet at Capt. Robbin's Homestead, where first alarm was given in Acion. Apiil 
19. 1775- 

9.30 O'CLOCK. 

Placing of markers on graves of one hundred Revolutionary soldiers in old cemetery. 



10 O'CLOCK. 

Dedication of Klanchard boulder on farm now occupied by Herman Gould 



10.30 O'CLOCK. 

Band concert on Common by Salem Cadet Band, Jean M. Missud, Conductor. 



10.45 O'CLOCK. 

Dedication of boulder at the Capt. Isaac Davis farm. 



11.00 O'CLOCK. 

Parade of Old Sixth Regiment and G. A. R. Posts on Common. 

Programme Cotitiniied on Page 15. 



Tuttle's 

Hack, Livery and 
Boardi ng Stable, 

HORSES FOR SALE OR EXCHANGE, 

Walden St., Concord, Mass. 



cSIS?.^. HORACE TUTTLE, Prop. 



Daniel Farrar, 

Wheelwright, 

Carriage Smith and 
General Jobber, 

EAST ACTON, MASS. 



Get Your Magazines, Fashion I^ R_ DEA.NE 

Papers, etc.. from 



THE MAYNARD NEWSDEALER. 



FRIEND, 



We sell the 

Best Candies 

in town. ^^'l_, --» 

TnE 



* 



Prescriptions 

Accurately 

Prepared. 



DRUGGIST, 



New Brick Block, Concord. 



Eugene G. Russell 



will personally conduct a party to Washing- 
ton, May 8 and 9. Everything guaranteed 
to be first-class. All expenses paid. The 
party will be gone one week. Several have 
already booked their names. Only a limited 
number can be accommodated. Price 
$23.60. For further particulars address 

E. Q. RUSSELL, 

407 Middlesex Street, 

Lowell, Mass. 



prooramme. — Continue^. 



12.45 O'CLOCK. 



Reception of Governor. 



Dinner in Town Hall. 



1.00 O'CLOCK. 



2.00 O'CLOCK. 

Exercises in tent, weather permitting, if not, in Town Hall. 



4.00 O'CLOCK. 

Band concert on Common by Salem Cadet Band, Jean M. Alissud, Conductor. 



Committee. 



E. F. CoNANT, Chairman, D. J. WETHfeRBEE, Isaiah Hutchins, 

John Fletcher, F. H. Whitcomb, Luther Conant, Augustine Hosmer, 

Anson Piper, Chas. Williams, Secretary, O. W. Mead. 



THE PLACS TO BUY IS AT 

. . . DEALER IN . . . 

DRY GOODS, HOSIERY, GLOVES, SMALL WARES, 

Gents' Furnishings, Hats, Caps, Trunks, Etc. 

ESTABLISHED 1845. 



OOJVOOI«I3, JVJiV^S®. 



15 



Qon^ of the IRevolution* 




Until lecentl}' it was supposed that Luke 
Smith of Acton was the only man living 
whose father was in the Concord fight. 
Lately it has been discovered that there 
are two sons of Ebenezer Edwards, who 
was also in Capt. Davis's company, still 
living, James M. Edwards and an older 
brother. James participates in the Acton 
celebration. 

It is remarkable that all the men living 
Avhose fathers were in the Concord fight 
are sons of Acton patriots. 



JAMES M. EDWARDS. 



Luke Smith, wliose father was in the 
Concord fight. 

The graves of more than one hundred 
soldiers of the Revolution are yearly 
decorated by Acton citizens. Among 
them are the following oflicers : 

Colonels Francis Faulkner, John Heald, 
John Edwards; Majors Benjamin Hay- 
wood, Daniel Fletclier, Rev. Moses 
Adams. 




'ff:^ 



LUKE SMITH. 



16 




POWDER HORN WORN BY JAMES HAYWARD, AT LEXINGTON. 
AND THROUGH WHICH HE WAS SHOT AND 
KILLED, APRIL 19, 1775. 

Upon the old grave stone which originally stood at the head of Hayward's grave 
-were the following inscriptions : 

" In memory of Mr. James Hayward, son of Capt. Samuel and Mrs. Mary Hay- 
ward, who was killed in Concord Fight, A-pril 19, 1775, aged 25 years and four days." 

" This monument may unborn ages tell 

How brave 3'oung Hayward like a hero fell 
When fighting for his countries libert}', 
Was slain, and here his bod}' now doth lye. 
He and his foe were by each other slain, 
His victim's blood with his ye earth did stain. 
Upon ye field he was with victory crowned, 
And yet must yield his breath upon that ground. 
He express't his hope in God before his death. 
After his foe had yielded up his breath. 
Oh, may his death a lasting witness lye 
Against oppressors bloody cruelty." 



We are happy in presenting to the eye 
of the public, and especially to his com- 
rades in war and peace, so truthful a like- 
ness of the captain. 

His modesty prevents our noticing all 
the good points of his face. 

The twinkle of his eye is somewhat 
concealed. The humor of his mouth is 
kept in the background by the wise dis- 
cretion of the artist. 

We all recognize the man in the picture, 
and give him a salvo of cheers. 

He was born Feb. 14, 1814, on the 
heights which overlook the village and 
town, one of the oldest of a large family 
of children. His father, Francis Tuttle, 
Esq., was for a long time an officer and 
influential citizen of the place. 

He was elected captain of the Davis 
Guards in the years 1855-57-59-61. He 
was twice postmaster. He was forty- 
seven years old at the outbreak of the 
war, and exempt by age from military 
duty. 




CAPT. DANIEL TUTTLE. 




Capt. Frank M. Whit- 
comb, commander of Isaac 
Davis Post, No. 138, G. A. R. 
Born in Boxboro July 7, 1838. 
Married Miss Frances Fuller 
in 1859. Twice enlisted into 
the army for the preservation 
of the Union. He was first 
sergeant in Co. E, Sixth Mass- 
achusetts Volunteers, for nine 
months, and captain of the 
same for one hundred days. 
Has served the town as select- 
man four years. He is a past 
grand in the Acton Lodge, 
I. O. O. F., and is upon the 
committee of arrangements for 
this celebration. 

The Isaac Da^'is Post was 
organized May 2, 1882. It 
now numbers eighty-six. 

The past commanders have 
been Chas. W. Parker, J. W. 
Lacker, C. B. Sanders, M. D., 
I. Hutchins M. D., S. A. Guil- 
ford, D. H. Hall, F. H. Stev- 
ens, F. R. Knowlton. Chas. 
A. Harrington and Luther Co- 
nant Esquires are honorary 
members. 




:^:L:Wopisi-'^:mS0m^ 






PROPRIETOR. 




pl^'^XA/nJ ^^^^^utuiJi^kA-^X^ 



Luke Blanchard, of West Acton, with commendable public spirit, has put a boulder 
opposite the residence of Herman Grould of Acton, with this inscription upon it : — G ' 

" From this farm went Calvin and Luther Blanchard to Concord Fight and Bunker 
Hill, sons of Simon Blanchard, who was killed at the battle of Quebec, 1759." Luther 
was the first man hit by a british ball at the old North Bridge, and died in the service'^a 
few months later. 

Mr. Blanchard was born in Boxboro, but has lived most of his life in West^ Acton, 
and has amassed a handsome fortune in handling produce, both in the Boston market 
and for export. His firm shipped sixty thousand barrels of apples last year, 

L. BLANCHARD & CO. 

Commission Merchants. 

Wholesale dealers in 

BerrieSf Fru it a nd Produce. 

No. 20 South Side Faneuil Hall Market, 
BOSTON, MASS. 



J. W. Godffey, W. D., 



MAIN STREET, 
CONCORD JUNCTION. 



Office Hours: 8 to 9, 12 to 2, 7 to 8 30. 




Col. Winthrop E. Faulkner, eminent 
as a musician, a soldier, and a citizen in 
public life. He represents the fourth 
generation of Faulkners in Acton. Was 
a state senator in 1853-54. He was one 
of the early projectors of the Fitchburg 
R. R., and a director many years. 




R. M. Yale S Co., 

Sail Makers 



AND MANUFACTURERS OF 

Italian Awnings, Tents, 
Flags, Wagon Coverings, 
Sackings, and Store Awn- 
ings of every description 

NO. !!S SO. PRKET STREET. 

The oldest representative of tlie sail 
aiul awiiiiii; making: industry in Boston. 

ESTABLISHED IN 1847. 



Vol. IV. Bancroft's History of the United States. 161 

The officers meeting in front of their men spolce a few words with one another and 
went back to their places. Barrett, the colonel, on horseback in the rear then gave the 
order to advance but not to fire unless attacked. The calm features of Isaac Davis of 
Acton became changed ; the town schoolmaster of Concord, who was present, could 
never afterwards find words strong enough to express how deeply his face reddened at 
the word of command. " I have not a man that is afraid to go," said Davis, looking at 
the men of Acton, and^drawing his sword he cried, " March." His company being in 
the right led the way toward the bridge, he himself at their head, and by his side Major 
John Buttrick of Concord, with John Robinson of Westford, lieutenant-colonel in 
Prescott's regiment, but on this day a volunteer without command. 

These three men walked together in front, followed by minute men and militia in 
double file trailing arms. They went down the hillock, entered the by road, came to its 
angle with the main road and there turned into the causeway that led straight to the 
bridge. The British began to take up the planks ; to prevent it the Americans quickened 
their step. At this the British fired one or two shots up the river ; then another, by 
which Luther Blanchard and Jonas Brown were wounded. A volley followed, and Isaac 
Davis and Abner Hosmer fell dead. Three hours before Davis had bid his wife fare- 
well. That afternoon he was carried home and laid in her bedroom. His countenance 
was pleasant in death. The bodies of two others of his company who were slain that 
day were brought to her house, and the three were followed to the village graveyard by 
a concourse of the neighbors from miles around. Heaven gave her length of days in 
the land which his devotion assisted to redeem. She lived to see her country reach the 
Gulf of Mexico and the Pacific. When it was grown great in numbers, wealth and 
power the United States in Congress bethought themselves to pay honors to her hus- 
band's martyrdom and comfort her under the double burden of sorrow and more than 
ninety years. 



21 




Rev. James Trask Woodbury was pastor of the Evangelical Church of Acton 
twenty years. He represented the town of Acton in the lower house in 1850-51. It 
is to his interest and eloquence in the Legislature that we are indebted for the Davis 
Monument. 



A. S human & Company 

CLOTHIERS and OUTFITTERS, 

SHUMAN CORNER, 
BOSTON. 



22 



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The second meeting-house, built in 1807. 
Here Rev. Moses Adams addressed the Davis 
Blues before they started for the defence of Bos- 
ton in the War of 1812. 




24 




Dr. Hutchins was born in Westford in 1829. Moved to Groton when about six yea.YS 
of age. Attended public schools in Westford and Groton, including Lawrence Academy 
in Groton. Graduated from medical college in 1852. United with Mass. Medical 
Society. Settled in the practice of medicine in West Acton in 1852. Was Acting 
Assistant Surgeon in the old Sixth Mass. Vols, in 1863 and 1864, for a nine months' 
campaign. Re-enlisted for 100 days as Lieut, in Qo. E, Sixth Mass. Inf. In 1864 resumed 
the practice of medicine in West Acton at the close of U. S. service. Is a member 
of the American Pharmaceutical Society, and also of the Mass. Pharmaceutical Society. 
Represented the 30th Republican District in the Mass. House of Representative! in the 
year 1893. Has been commander and an active member of Isaac Davis Post, G. A. R., 
No. 138, since its organization ; also member of St. Paul's Lodge of Free and Accepted 
Masons ; also of Acton Lodge, I. O. O, F. Last, but not least. Superintendent of the 
Baptist Sunday school for twenty-five years consecutively, and one of the Deacons of 
the Baptist Church. Was married in 1852 to Miss Sarah A. Fuller, daughter of Alden 
Fuller, Esq., of Acton. 

New England Decorating Company, 

144 STATE STREET, BOSTON, M/ISS. 



New Decorations for Balls, Parties and Banquets. 

Outside Decorations for Buildings. Booths Designed, Erected and Decorated 

for Fairs, etc. All kinds of Society Work a Specialty Lanterns 

for Lawn Parties. Flags and Bunting made 

ALL WORK DONE WITH PROMPTNESS AND TASTE. ESTIMATES FREELY GIVEN. 



? 



LIBRARY OF CONGRESS 




iniiii 

011 699 209 7 



I 



fJ,o/-J/ec^' ^4 



INSCRIPTION. 



" The Commonwealth of Massachusetts and the Town of Acton, co-operating to perpetuate 
the fame of their glorious deeds of patriotism, have erected this monument in honor of Capt. 
Isaac Davis and privates AitxEU Hosmeh and Jamf<:s IIaywahd, citizen soldiers of Acton, and 
Provincial Minute Men, who fell in Concord light, the 10th day of April, A. D. 1775. On the 
morning of that eventful day, the Provincial olHcers held a coimcil of war near the old North 
Bridgeln Concord; and as they separated, Davis exclaimed: " I haven't a man that is afraid to 
go!" and immediately marched his company from the left to the right of the line, and led in the 
first organized attack upon the troops of George III., in that memorable war which, by the help 
of fiod, made the thirteen colonies independent of Great Britain, and gave political being to the 
United States of America. 

Acton, April 19th, 1851."